White Noise
Aircraft Cabin
Atmosphere Sounds

About

Relaxing sounds of Aircraft Cabin White Noise

Owner

An aircraft is a vehicle or machine that is able to fly by gaining support from the air. It counters the force of gravity by using either static lift or by using the dynamic lift of an airfoil,[1] or in a few cases the downward thrust from jet engines. Common examples of aircraft include airplaneshelicoptersairships (including blimps), glidersparamotors, and hot air balloons.
In signal processingwhite noise is a random signal having equal intensity at different frequencies, giving it a constant power spectral density.[1] The term is used, with this or similar meanings, in many scientific and technical disciplines, including physicsacoustical engineeringtelecommunications, and statistical forecasting. White noise refers to a statistical model for signals and signal sources, rather than to any specific signal. White noise draws its name from white light,[2] although light that appears white generally does not have a flat power spectral density over the visible band.


tenaturesounds-aircraft
Wind
Sounds

Relaxing sounds of Wind

Owner

Wind is the natural movement of air or other gases relative to a planet's surface. Wind occurs on a range of scales, from thunderstorm flows lasting tens of minutes, to local breezes generated by heating of land surfaces and lasting a few hours, to global winds resulting from the difference in absorption of solar energy between the climate zones on Earth. The two main causes of large-scale atmospheric circulation are the differential heating between the equator and the poles, and the rotation of the planet (Coriolis effect). Within the tropics and subtropics, thermal low circulations over terrain and high plateaus can drive monsoon circulations. In coastal areas the sea breeze/land breeze cycle can define local winds; in areas that have variable terrain, mountain and valley breezes can prevail.



therainsounds-wind
OCEAN
& RAIN

Soothing Rain in the Ocean Sounds

Owner

Approximately 505,000 km3 (121,000 cu mi) of water falls as precipitation each year across the globe with 398,000 km3 (95,000 cu mi) of it over the oceans.[136] Given the Earth's surface area, that means the globally averaged annual precipitation is 990 mm (39 in). Deserts are defined as areas with an average annual precipitation of less than 250 mm (10 in) per year,[137][138] or as areas where more water is lost by evapotranspiration than falls as precipitation.


thenaturesounds-ocean rain


WHITE NOISE
COLLECTION

4 Hours Collection of White Noise Sounds

TRAVEL FAR ENOUGH, YOU MEET YOURSELF

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